Where the Great Wall of China starts (or ends)


One of the less visited places in China is Shanhaiguan in Hebei province. There we can find the point where the Great Wall of China extends to the sea. This is called Laolongtou or Old Dragon’s Head.

Laolongtou (Old Dragon's Head): the Great Wall extends to the Bohai Sea

Laolongtou (Old Dragon’s Head): the Great Wall extends to the Bohai Sea

On top of the wall and only a hundred of metes or so is a great building, Chenghai Pavilion, used by the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) emperors on their way to to worship their ancestors.

Chenghai Pavilion

Chenghai Pavilion

The steps to the Chenghai Pavilion

The steps to the Chenghai Pavilion

Next to the Chenghai Pavilion is the Royal Pavilion build by emperor Qianlong in 1755 and rebuilt in 1992. (Click a picture to open the gallery.)

"See Water Looks Like a Spoon of Water"

“See Water Looks Like a Spoon of Water”

20060630-IMG_3107

Close to the Royal Pavilion stays a stone from Ming Dynasty (1368–1644), found during the rebuilding of this part of the Great Wall.

Just stop for a moment to think the text in the stone: “See water looks like a spoon of water”. Is that a poetic way to describe the greatness of the Chinese reign of that time, described by some as “one of the greatest eras of orderly government and social stability in human history”.

About Olli Laasanen

Eyes and ears open. New and old. Jobs and hobbies. Pictures and music. Entertaining and serious. Change and stability. Nature and urban.
This entry was posted in China, Photo, photography, Travel, Valokuvaus, Yhteiskunta and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Where the Great Wall of China starts (or ends)

  1. rigbyte says:

    “one of the greatest eras of orderly government and social stability in human history”.
    Ah… but the cost in human misery, pain and sadness to keep the emperor and his wealthy cohorts in the luxury they desired… Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. I can admire the artistry and craftsmanship, but not the unpleasant side effects of such megalomania.
    Good photos…:)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s