Broadley’s Flat Lizard


This beautiful small lizard is also called Augrabies Flat Lizard, because it is common in Augrabies Falls National Park in South Africa.

The bright colors of the mail lizards make them an easy catch for predators such as rock kestrels. Females and juveniles are much more modest.

For me the lizards were an easy target as well. They let me approach very close, up to half a meter.

(Click any picture to see them larger.)

About Olli Laasanen

Eyes and ears open. New and old. Jobs and hobbies. Pictures and music. Entertaining and serious. Change and stability. Nature and urban.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Animals, Nature, Photo, photography, South Africa, Travel, Valokuvaus and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Broadley’s Flat Lizard

  1. rigbyte says:

    What magnificent colours. Lizard so often look perky and intelligent. I wonder if the colours are a distraction for predators – they will follow the male, leaving the female and younger ones time to escape.

    • Could be, though Wikipedia mentions another reason for the colors: “Research indicates that the higher the UV levels on a male’s throat, the more dominant it is and is less likely to be challenged. These flat lizards have been discovered to have a much higher visual sensitivity to UV light than other lizards species, allowing males to accurately distinguish between conspecifics of various fitness.”

      • rigbyte says:

        Yes, your explanations seems much more likely. There’s no indication of scale, but I imagine they’re quite small. We’re the hosts of several by two-metre monitor lizards that steal our hens’ eggs, and wait patiently for young chicks to stray from their mothers.

  2. rigbyte says:

    Oh dear, three errors in that reply… apologies. I’ve an impatient finger always too ready to press ‘enter’.

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